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Holocene Mysteries
What really happened during that early twilight zone of human existence--after the last Ice Age, but before people started writing things down? We live in an epoch called the Holocene, which began about 12,000 years ago, and of which we know relatively little except for the past 6,000 years since writing was invented. But there are mysterious megaliths around the world, and strange cities built by skull cultists who kept their dead around--and other evidence that all is not what we may think. Wi... more info>>
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Virginal Huntress/Warrior: Her Undying Ice Age Cult
Fierce and beautiful, she still today brings with her a breath of Ice Age mystery. With minor variations, she is Athena, Joan of Arc, Marianne of the Barricades, and Rosie the Riveter. The Ionians worshipped her since at least Neolithic times. When the Greeks founded the chief city of Attica during the Iron Age, they named their city after her: Athens. Atop the city's high hill, they created a sanctuary dedicated to her, and named its chief temple the Parthenon, which means Temple of the Virgin.... more info>>
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The Paris Gun of 1918, and The Century Leading To It
Alone in the annals of history stands a super-weapon that terrorized Paris during Germany's last desperate campaign to win World War I. The Paris Gun was a marvel of technology. It required the work of astronomers, geographers, physicists, chemists, and other scientific experts to create a weapon that could fire on Paris from behind German lines--a range of 81 miles (130 kilometers). The shell traveled through the edge of space, and calculations had to be made to account for the earth's rotation... more info>>
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5 Steps to a 5 AP European History, 2008-2009 Edition
A PERFECT PLAN FOR THE PERFECT SCORE We want you to succeed on your AP* exam. That's why we've created this 5-step plan to help you study more effectively, use your preparation time wisely, and get your best score. This easy-to-follow guide offers you a complete review of your AP course, strategies to give you the edge on test day, and plenty of practice with AP-style test questions. You'll sharpen your subject knowledge, strengthen your thinking skills, and build your test-taking confidence wi... more info>>
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Still Waters
"Once they said God himself could not sink her!" The Maiden voyage of the Titanic was to be the toast of Europe. Filled with the richest people in the world, there was no end to the trip's possibilities. At least, that is what Archaeologist Dennis Parker thought. The voyage was soon interrupted by a series of grisly murders. The type not seen since Jack the Ripper. All hands on the ship were baffled at who the murderer was. Dennis seemed to know. Could the murderer be his cargo? Could the murder... more info>>
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Slave Narratives of Maryland
A collection of interviews with former slaves made by the U.S. Government's Work Project Administration during the Great Depression.
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Battlefields of the Civil War: A Guide for Travelers Volume II
Here is a practical guide to touring the battlefields of the Civil War. The action is described as it happened at each location. You will hear the first shots fired at Fort Sumter, travel with general Sherman on his march through Georgia, suffer the horrors of the Battles of Seven Days and fight in the trenches around Petersburgh. Other chapters tell the stories of Pickett's Mill, Fort Pulaski, Pea Ridge, Kennesaw Mountain and many more. Finally you will follow General Lee's desperate retreat to... more info>>
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Ed Wood: The Early Years
The Inside Story of How Ed Wood Jr. Became the Way He Was! The truth about this eccentric Hollywood genius at last--Ed Wood as the Tim Burton movie didn't show him--and as he didn't want you to know him. In this sure to be controversial book (the first of a projected two-volume biography), filmland journalist Jean Marie Stine (who knew Ed Wood and his inner circle personally) deflates the many myths Ed Wood, Jr. created about his own life, chronicles the youth, war years, and post-war years of t... more info>>
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Epic Rivalry: Inside the Soviet and American Space Race
When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon in 1969, they personified an almost unimaginable feat?the incredibly complex task of sending humans safely to another celestial body. This extraordinary odyssey, which grew from the rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War, was galvanized by the Sputnik launch in 1957. To mark the fiftieth anniversary of Sputnik, National Geographic recaptures this gripping moment in the human experience with a lively and co... more info>>
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Spectator In Hell: A British Soldier's Story of Imprisonment in Auschwitz
In 1942 the young soldier Arthur Dodd was taken prisoner by the German Army and transported to Oswiecim in Polish Upper Silesia. The German name for the place was 'Auschwitz': a name now synonymous with man's darkest hour. Auschwitz-Birkenau, the most infamous German death-camp of the Second World War, functioned for the incarceration and extermination of those that the third Reich deemed "undesirables": Jews, homosexuals, Communists. What is less known is that it was the fate of hundreds of Bri... more info>>
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Mr. Jefferson's University
In Charlottesville, Virginia, at the University of Virginia, there is today--beneath the irregular rhythms of modern student comings and goings--a severely rhythmic expression of the Enlightenment, a philosophy concretized in brick and timber. The play of one architectural element into another is meant to express the interconnectedness of all knowledge. It is Jefferson's last but not his least achievement, and one of the three things that he put on his own tombstone to be remembered by. In impor... more info>>
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Amazing True Stories of Execution Blunders
The business of death can be seriously absurd, and nothing illustrates this better than these gruesome true tales. This gory compendium details the frankly ridiculous ways in which a number of ill-fated unfortunates met (or failed to meet) their maker at the hands of lamentably inept executioners. With black and white illustrations, this book brings together a mixture of bungled executions, strange last requests and classic one-liners from medieval times to the present day.
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St George--Knight, Martyr, Patron Saint, and Dragonslayer: The Pocket Essential Guide
St. George is a figure that bridges many worlds. At the heart of the myths and legends surrounding this English icon lies the story of an Early Christian Martyr persecuted by the Roman Empire around the third century AD. But England is only one country to have adopted this legendary soldier saint as their patron. Other countries including Germany, Armenia, Hungary, Portugal and Malta have all claimed him as their own. The cult of St. George is astonishingly widespread with churches being dedicat... more info>>
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Nazi War Trials: The Pocket Essential Guide
At the end of the Second World War the victorious Allies began unprecedented proceedings against those leading Nazis who had been captured. The trial that followed was conducted in four languages and involved over 400 sessions of open court. Andrew Walker provides a chronology of the proceedings and revealing portraits of the personalities involved. There are frequent references to the terrible events unleashed on Europe by the Nazis and the book asks the questions that were raised at the time a... more info>>
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The Jewish State--Zionist Classic (Zionism, Judaism)
Classic zionist author Theodor Herzl's popular book The Jewish State, originally published in 1896. This book features 19th century discussion on the state of Jews around the world and in the United States.
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Lost Histories: Exploring the World's Most Famous Mysteries
Lost Histories looks at some of the great mysteries of the past, telling the stories of the tomb raiders and glory seekers who sought to solve them, and examining legends and historical facts to sort truth from myth.
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Letters of a Soldier
Real letters written by a French Soldier during the First World War. Touching letters written to his mother and other loved ones sharing his thoughts, feelings and fears from August 14, 1914 to his disappearance on April 6, 1915.
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CND: Now More Than Ever: The Story of a Peace Movement
Published to mark the 60th anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, CND: Now More Than Ever is a fascinating and timely look at an archetypal campaigning organisation. 'CND remains a key and important part of the peace movement.' Ken Livingstone
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Urban Legends
In this book Nick Harding sets out to describe a host of Urban Legends suggesting that we should not dismiss them purely as nonsense nor accept them as gospel truth but by striving to understand their underlying meanings we begin to see their true worth as folklore for the modern world. To understand folklore and therefore the realm of the Urban Legend is to understand the psyche of a nation. By understanding Urban Legends we can gain an insight into our own fears and those of our fellow human b... more info>>
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Calamity Jane
The true life story of the frontier scout Martha Jane Cannary, who was known as "Calamity Jane." Calamity Jane scouted for General Custer, delivered the mail for the Pony Express, went to Deadwood with Wild Bill Hickock, and ended her career as an entertainer in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Shows. In this story of her own life she tells of her exciting adventures. This is a low reading level book with high interest for people seeking authentic narratives by historical women.
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From October to Brest-Litovsk
A Leon Trotzky classic.
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Nelson
Nelson continues to fascinate academics as well as the general public. He is still considered one of Britain's greatest heroes and featured within the top ten of the BBC poll of such figures. But why does Nelson still remain such a prominent figure in the national imagination? With 2005 being the bicentenary of the Battle of Trafalgar, Victoria Carolan embarks on a timely reappraisal of Nelson, the myth and the man. Beginning with Nelson's early life and an analysis of the condition and practice... more info>>
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Titanic Lessons for IT Projects
Building upon the popularity of the first book in the Lessons from History series, this book presents lessons for IT project managers harvested from the project that designed, built, and launched the H.M.S. Titanic. Full of practical advice, this book builds on the most notorious "failed project" in recent memory, the sinking of an "unsinkable" ship.
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The Battle of Cedar Creek: Self-Guided Tour
On October 19, 1864, the last great battle of the Civil War in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley took place along Cedar Creek between the towns of Strasburg and Middletown. Beginning with a brilliant Confederate surprise attack on Major General Philip Sheridan's Army of the Shenandoah but culminating in the Union rout of the forces commanded by Lieutenant General Jubal Early, it marked the end of Confederate power in the Valley, and its timing three weeks before the national elections unquestionably ... more info>>
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The History of the Peloponnesian War
A Thucydides classic.
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