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15 Serial Killers: Docufictions
Taking as his text Georges Bataille's insight that "only at the extremes is there freedom," critically acclaimed "guerrilla writer" Harold Jaffe documents Bataille's aperçu with 15 bone-chilling illustrations. Manson, Starkweather, Speck, Son of Sam, the Night Stalker, Aileen Wuornos, the Unabomber, Dahmer, Bundy, Gacy, Kemper, Kevorkian and Kissinger are not merely present and accounted for, they are rendered into a "reality TV" that you've never seen before. Widely praised as a virtuoso stylis... more info>>
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A Grave Too Many
Which grave is the true resting place of Andrew Weatherby Beachamp-Proctor? How can a body be buried in two places 6,000 miles apart and why is an old man in the village of Upavon so upset by the appearance of the young man from Mafeking?
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A Talent to Deceive: Who REALLY Killed the Lindbergh Baby?
The kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh's infant son, and the subsequent trial and execution of Bruno Richard Hauptmann, have been a source of fascination for more than 70 years. Now, for the first time, William Norris delves into sources of information ignored by previous investigators and comes up with the identity of the true culprit.
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Brutes, Beasts and Human Fiends
Ten True Stores of America's Most Depraved Murderers of All Time. If your heart and stomach are strong enough, then you will surely enjoy this blood-chilling parade of murders and other grisly deeds too ghastly to mention here. This collection of true stories of unholy horror and unspeakable evil were written by one of America's most brilliant fact-crime reporters--Alan Hynd. Excerpt: "What do you want fly paper in the middle of the winter for, Mrs. Lewis?" asked the grocer."I can't explain it,... more info>>
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For a House Made of Stone: Gina's Story
The latest ghosted memoir from Andrew Crofts, the bestselling ghost writer of The Little Prisoner, The Kid and Just a Boy. This is the extraordinary true story of a young woman from the Philippine mountains who wanted to help her family and ended up on trial for murder in the UK in 2001.
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High Sierra
The tormented and exhausted man at the center of W.R. Burnett's High Sierra is a notorious criminal whom the newspapers call "Mad Dog" Roy Earle. Earle is every bit the criminal the newspapers depict, but he is a complicated soul who is the tragic hero of the novel--a horribly flawed man, a violent criminal who still retains a bit of a conscience but never gets a decent break. As in most of Burnett's novels, High Sierra ostensibly describes a carefully plotted crime that is undermined by human n... more info>>
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Inside Death Row
Inside Death Row is both a qualitative and quantitative study of death row inmates in America, based on several years of research and correspondence with the condemned.
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Missing
Missing is a true story. In retelling it, writer Thomas Hauser did not need to novelize it. Using the facts alone, the book unfolds with the breathtaking suspense and intrigue of a fully imagined political thriller. Missing explores the fate of a young American journalist named Charles Horman who, living in Chile in 1973 just before the overthrow of the country's Marxist president Salvatore Allende, discovered evidence of the United States' involvement in an impending right-wing coup to overthro... more info>>
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Night of the Juggler
In New York, a psychopathic killer will strike on October 15, as he always does--the anniversary of his mother's death, when he will kidnap, rape and murder an innocent young girl by slashing her jugular vein. William P. McGivern's Night of the Juggler tells the tense story of the serial killer as he prepares to kill again and the New York cops who are trying to find him before he strikes. A task force has been formed in the NYPD to find the killer known as the Juggler. Detective Vincent "Gypsy"... more info>>
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The Fabulous Clipjoint
Fredric Brown's The Fabulous Clipjoint comes from a now-vanished world of crime fiction that once satisfied the same appetites in the audience that are now fed by television programming. Neatly crafted and loaded with atmosphere and humor, The Fabulous Clipjoint, published in 1947, follows the exploits of an unlikely pair of amateur sleuths--a teenaged boy and his uncle, who follows the carnival--in solving a disturbing murder. The victim is a drunk, who seems to have gotten rolled and winds up ... more info>>
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The Iron Ghetto
A deeply moving and realistic account of prison life and its social ramifications. A combination of first-hand observations, psychological theory, and critical philosophical insights into a forlorn culture which few endeavor to understand, but which for the lack of such understanding we are all very much at a loss. Sometimes controversial; sometimes pathetic; humorous; shocking, but always realistic, resourceful, and insightful. [Cover art Dirk A. Wolf]
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The Man Who Fell From the Sky
Captain Alfred Lowenstein, Companion of the Bath, multi-millionaire, aviator and sportsman, friend of kings, maker and loser of fortunes, was going to his grave almost alone at the age of fifty-one. Here is the true story of the gaudy life and bizarre demise of 20's tycoon Alfred Loewenstein--and the modern-day quest to solve the tantalizing mystery of his death.
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