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The Masquerader
Two incidents, widely different in character yet bound together by results, marked the night of January the twenty-third. On that night the blackest fog within a four years' memory fell upon certain portions of London, and also on that night came the first announcement of the border risings against the Persian government in the province of Khorasan the announcement that, speculated upon, even smiled at, at the time, assumed such significance in the light of after events.
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The Misuse of Mind
A Karin Stephen classic.
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The Mystery of Mary: A Christian Mystery
Fast-paced, entertaining mystery about a beautiful woman running away from someone or something. A man meets her at the train station and tries to help her without knowing all of her mysterious past. Mary's story is revealed through the many twists and turns of the plot.
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The Night Before Christmas
The Night Before Christmas
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The Olive Fairy Book
A unique collection of 29 fairy tales edited by Andrew Lang. These stories, not so well-known and yet so beautifully told, are derived from Turkey, India, Denmark and others. Read about the enchanted lovers in "The Blue Parrot", the self-sacrificing love of "Little King Loc", the bunniah's comic attempt in cheating a farmer in "A Long-Bow Story", the capable wife who transforms her husband to a hero in "Samba the Coward", a gutsy princess who makes her own fortune in "Kupti and Imani", and the n... more info>>
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The Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc--Volume 1
To arrive at a just estimate of a renowned man's character one must judge it by the standards of his time, not ours. Judged by the standards of one century, the noblest characters of an earlier one lose much of their luster; judged by the standards of to-day, there is probably no illustrious man of four or five centuries ago whose character could meet the test at all points. But the character of Joan of Arc is unique.
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The Playboy of the Western World
A J. M. Synge classic.
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The Prince of India: Volume 1
In the noon of a September day in the year of our dear Lord 1395, a merchant vessel nodded sleepily upon the gentle swells of warm water flowing in upon the Syrian coast. A modern seafarer, looking from the deck of one of the Messagerie steamers now plying the same line of trade, would regard her curiously, thankful to the calm which held her while he slaked his wonder, yet more thankful that he was not of her passage.
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The Rambling Notes of an Idle Excursion
All the journeyings I had ever done had been purely in the way of business. The pleasant May weather suggested a novelty namely, a trip for pure recreation, the bread-and-butter element left out. The Reverend said he would go, too; a good man, one of the best of men, although a clergyman. By eleven at night we were in New Haven and on board the New York boat. We bought our tickets, and then went wandering around here and there, in the solid comfort of being free and idle, and of putting distance... more info>>
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The Ruling Passion
Let me never tag a moral to a story, nor tell a story without a meaning. Make me respect my material so much that I dare not slight my work. Help me to deal very honestly with words and with people because they are both alive. Show me that as in a river, so in a writing, clearness is the best quality, and a little that is pure is worth more than much that is mixed. Teach me to see the local colour without being blind to the inner light.
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The Sand Pebbles
Literary theorist Georg Lukács complains in his seminal work, The Historical Novel, that the works of imaginative literature too often use history as a mere backdrop, a way for an author to decorate the story and characters. Lukács singles out Sir Walter Scott, English author of such works as Ivanhoe and the Waverly novels, as a notable exception. According to Lukács Scott's novels document, with painstaking verisimilitude, the character of the historical period in which the action is taking pla... more info>>
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The Sea Wolf
Jack London's classic tale of is best known for his lead character, Wolf Larsen, a seaman with a will. Ostensibly the book was written to refute Nietzche's premise in Man and Superman. Though Wolf Larson is one of the most memorable characters in fiction, he bears little resemblance to Super Man, either the comic book, or the Nietzche variety. He does, as has been observed often, bear a considerable resemblance to London, himself.
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The Second Tarzan Omnibus
Three More Full Length Tarzan Books In One! Read three Tarzan novels in one eBook--for one low price. The Beasts of Tarzan and The Son of Tarzan tell the thrill-packed story of the kidnapping of the jungle lord's infant son by a treacherous enemy. Tarzan's best efforts to track the culprit prove fruitless, and, in what the enemy feels is the perfect revenge, the boy is abandoned in the jungle, to die among the animals. But one of Tarzan's ape friends senses the foundling is the jungle lord's son... more info>>
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The Secret Adversary [Tommy and Tuppence Book 1]
The sinking of the Lusitania is only a taste of the action when Tommy meets Tuppence in World War I England and the two set out together to foil an enemy spy.
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The Secret Places of the Heart
The maid was a young woman of great natural calmness; she was accustomed to let in visitors who had this air of being annoyed and finding one umbrella too numerous for them. It mattered nothing to her that the gentleman was asking for Dr. Martineau as if he was asking for something with an unpleasant taste. Almost imperceptibly she relieved him of his umbrella and juggled his hat and coat on to a massive mahogany stand.
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The Sirens of Titan
"His best book," Esquire wrote of Kurt Vonnegut's 1959 novel The Sirens of Titan, adding, "he dares not only to ask the ultimate question about the meaning of life, but to answer it." This novel fits into that aspect of the Vonnegut canon that might be classified as science fiction, a quality that once led Time to describe Vonnegut as "George Orwell, Dr. Caligari and Flash Gordon compounded into one writer ... a zany but moral mad scientist." The Sirens of Titan was perhaps the novel that began ... more info>>
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The Star-Spangled Banner
On August 18, 1814, Admiral Cockburn, having returned with his fleet from the West Indies, sent to Secretary Monroe at Washington, the following threat:
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The Story of the Amulet
There were once four children who spent their summer holidays in a white house, happily situated between a sandpit and a chalkpit. One day they had the good fortune to find in the sandpit a strange creature. Its eyes were on long horns like snail's eyes, and it could move them in and out like telescopes. It had ears like a bat's ears, and its tubby body was shaped like a spider's and covered with thick soft fur--and it had hands and feet like a monkey's. It told the children--whose names were Cy... more info>>
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The Sunny Side
The Sunny Side is a long-forgotten collection of short stories by A.A. Milne. Though Milne is best known for his classic children's books, these tales for adults shine just as brightly, full of wit and wisdom. From summer days to war time, from dogs to gardens and card games, these stories are perfect reading in the hammock or by the fire.
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The Tale of Balen
A Charles A. Swinburne classic.
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The Third Tarzan Omnibus: Tarzan the Untamed, Tarzan the Terrible, Tarzan and the Golden Lion
A Trio of Full Length Tarzan Books in One! Here are three of the best Tarzan novels in one eBook--for one low price. In Tarzan the Untamed, the ape man goes on a trail of vengeance when German soldiers burn his African ranch and he finds Jane's charred body among the ruins. In Tarzan the Terrible, the discovery that Jane still lives, her apparent death a trick by enemy soldiers, sends the jungle lord into the almost impenetrable fastnesses of the lost land of Pal-ul-don. There he finds two kingd... more info>>
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The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson
There is no character, howsoever good and fine, but it can be destroyed by ridicule, howsoever poor and witless. Observe the ass, for instance: his character is about perfect, he is the choicest spirit among all the humbler animals, yet see what ridicule has brought him to. Instead of feeling complimented when we are called an ass, we are left in doubt.
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The Two Vanrevels
It was long ago in the days when men sighed when they fell in love; when people danced by candle and lamp, and did dance, too, instead of solemnly gliding about; in that mellow time so long ago, when the young were romantic and summer was roses and wine, old Carewe brought his lovely daughter home from the convent to wreck the hearts of the youth of Rouen.
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The Voice in the Fog
A London fog, solid, substantial, yellow as an old dog's tooth or a jaundiced eye. You could not look through it, nor yet gaze up and down it, nor over it; and you only thought you saw it. The eye became impotent, untrustworthy; all senses lay fallow except that of touch; the skin alone conveyed to you with promptness and no incertitude that this thing had substance. You could feel it; you could open and shut your hands and sense it on your palms, and it penetrated your clothes and beaded your ... more info>>
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The Water Goats and Other Troubles
"And then," said the landscape gardener, combing his silky, pointed beard gently with his long, artistic fingers, "in the lake you might have a couple of gondolas. Two would be sufficient for a lake of this size; amply sufficient. Yes," he said firmly, "I would certainly advise gondolas. They look well, and the children like to ride on them. And so do the adults. I would have two gondolas in the lake."
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