Bio: Gerald Green was born in Brooklyn in 1922, where his father Dr. Samuel Greenberg practiced medicine. Green took an undergraduate degree from Columbia University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, served in World War II and returned to Columbia for an M.S. in Journalism. He edited news copy for the International News Service before becoming one of the first news writers at the NBC television network. Joining the staff of the Today show, when Dave Garroway was its host, Green became involved in all facets of the, as writer, producer and director. In 1950, Green published his first novel, His Majesty O'Keefe, co-written with Lawrence Klingman. He established himself as a major novelist in 1956 with the publication of The Last Angry Man, a passionate novel that reflects his experience in television and his love for his father, who died in 1952; Green wrote both the 1959 film adaptation and its 1974 television remake. He is also the author of The Sword and the Sun and The Hostage Heart. His long-running involvement in film and television resulted in his Emmy Award-winning teleplay for Holocaust, which adapted as a novel, and scripts for Fatal Judgment, Wallenberg: A Hero's Story and Kent State. Gerald Green continues to write and produce television and feature films.

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Holocaust
Historical accounts of tragedies such as the Holocaust often allow readers and students a certain detachment in the formidable but impersonal catalogue of numbers, events, policies and processes. Gerald Green's novel Holocaust, which is based on his teleplay for the 1978 NBC miniseries, seeks to put faces on the tragedy by telling the story of the experience of two German families whose lives intersect at certain points. The Dorfs are "good" Germans, loyal to the new Nazi regime, and their son E... more info>>
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The Last Angry Man
The seismic shifts in American life in the years following World War II have inspired several generations of novelists, but few have described the fallout of those changes as poignantly and with as much understanding as Gerald Green did in The Last Angry Man, published in 1956. At a time when the world had begun to focus on angry young men, Green created a magnificently angry old one as his hero. Based on his father, the title character is a doctor and a man of principle whose life's work is abo... more info>>
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